Around the Mountain We Go: How the Church’s Character Gets Smeared by Identity Politics

We go through this every year, America. Every year. White nationalists and other iterations of the Alt-Right coalesce somewhere like they did in Charlottesville, Virginia recently. And they do what they always do: they wave their Confederate flags, chant their neo-Nazi slogans, and champion identity-based politics. Some of them claim to represent Jesus and Christianity … More Around the Mountain We Go: How the Church’s Character Gets Smeared by Identity Politics

Addressing the Great Divorce between Millennials and the Church

Whether it’s garnering good press or bad press, millennials fill up news broadcasts and op-ed columns. Studies and surveys observe and record their worldviews and tastes, since they are the generational bracket that is coming of age. They have emerged as the leaders, businessmen, and parents of the present. The Center for Generational Kinetics defines … More Addressing the Great Divorce between Millennials and the Church

God Needs Survivors, Not Superstars

It’s tempting to become a Monday morning quarterback when reading about the Apostle Peter. He gets a bad rap in sermons and Bible studies—the motor-mouth, the braggart, the guy everyone dismisses with a condescending pat on the back because he’s self-sabotaged once again. There’s no doubt Peter’s tragedies convolute his triumphs, but before we shake … More God Needs Survivors, Not Superstars

What We Forget about Stephen’s Martyrdom

Stephen is a beloved character to me, not solely because he testified to the Gospel without self-censorship before the Sanhedrin and forgive his killers as they stoned him—but that his steadfastness manifested from the beginning of his story. When rehashing Stephen’s life, it’s only natural to focus on his testimony before the Sanhedrin and martyrdom, … More What We Forget about Stephen’s Martyrdom

Battered, Not Broken

We try to trivialize our pain around other Christians, hedging it off in Christianese language, telling our friends and family that we’re “going through a wilderness season.” There’s plenty of other metaphors I could use, such as “walking through the storm,” but I’ll spare the rest. I think we downgrade our admissions of torment, because … More Battered, Not Broken